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cartes-de-visite (card photographs)

 Subject
Subject Source: Art & Architecture Thesaurus
Scope Note: Small-format photographs affixed to card stock, popular in the mid-19th century. They went out of fashion in the 1870s. The photographs were typically portraits and the image was a standard size of 3 1/4 x 2 1/4 inches; they were generally produced by a multiple-lens camera that created several images on a single full-sized negative plate. Full-size prints from the plate were cut into sections measuring 4 x 2 1/2 inches, and the pieces were often mounted on cards, which initially served as visitors' cards; it later became the custom to exchange them on birthdays and holidays, and to collect cartes-de-visite of friends, family members, and celebrities in albums. Examples are card photographs patented by the Parisian photographer André-Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri in 1854 and similar items produced by Mathew B. Brady and other photographers.

Found in 1 Collection or Record:

Nancy Pettit McLaughlin Diary

 Collection — Folder 2017-015
Identifier: MSS-0099
Content Description The diary of Nancy Pettit McLaughlin documents her daily life after her marriage in Shiloh, Ohio. The entries reveal the activities of McLaughlin's daily life including what appears to be marital problems as she refers to "separating" from her husband in at least one instance. She also references her sister Amelia applying for a divorce. The diary's entries are regular for January-June 1898 and then cease until entries resume in 1903. The ledger also includes pages of expense at the back of the ...